A Typical Day in the Life

Hey! Today I’m going to share what a typical Friday looks like, for me.

6:30: wake up and have tea

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Most mornings, I wake up naturally around 6:30. Since I have a big window in my room, the sunlight streams in every morning. I’m definitely a morning perso

n, and love starting my day with a mug of tea. I brought my own milk frother from home, so I can make my own tea lattes using Earl Grey or English Breakfast tea, milk, honey, and vanilla extract.

7:00-9:00: cleaning at Zama Yoga

I’m very lucky to live three minutes from a wonderful yoga studio called Zama Yoga. I’m volunteering there as a Karma Yogi, which means that in exchange for vacuuming, mopping, and dusting the studio for two hours each week, I get free yoga! It’s a great deal, especially because I’m a yoga fanatic… on a budget. For two hours, I wipe the kitchenette sink and counters, take out the garbage, and make sure the mirrors, walls, and floor are neat and tidy. My favourite part is rolling up the yoga straps, and making sure the bolsters (yoga cushions) and blocks are organized.

9:30-10:30: Hatha yoga class at Zama Yoga

After my cleaning shift, I do a yoga class. On Fridays, this class is Hatha yoga, which is a relatively gentle branch of yoga that combines strength-based asanas (postures) with poses that challenge my flexibility. After a series of sun salutations and other flow sequences, we reach the best part of class – the savasana. Savasana, or corpse pose, is normally done at the end of a yoga practice, and involves lying on the back, with arms and legs spread. It’s very restorative, especially with the use of a bolster. I’d hate to brag about this, but I’m pretty good at savasana.

10:30-11:30: prepare for school

After the yoga class, I head back home and get ready for my classes of the day. Sometimes, I have a snack, and other times, I catch up on some readings. Today, I focus on a sociology reading for a course called SOCY2179. This fascinating course focuses on the role of sex, drugs, and disease for human health. We recently completed a series of lectures on the history of sex; with the help of numerous intriguing readings, I can certainly say that my eyes have been opened with regards to sexually-transmitted diseases, social injustice, and how they have affected human health over the year.

11:30-12:00: go to school

Time to head to class! I quickly change my clothes, put on closed-toed shoes (once I wore sandals to school on a lab day, and had to go back home just to change into my sneakers), and pack my backpack. The ride to school is about fifteen minutes, but sometimes a little longer when the buses are busy.

12:00-1:00: Biology lecture

My only lecture of the day is called Arthropods and Human Health (BIOL3009). In this course, I learn about disease-carrying organisms, such as mosquitos, ticks, mites, and lice – and how they influence human health. I have a special passion for this field because I’ve spent long periods of time in Kathmandu, Nepal, and various cities in Cambodia. Prior to visiting these third-world countries, I did a lot of research into vaccinations for mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. Before my trip to Nepal, I received six needles! Anyways, today we talk about a deadly tick called Ixodes holocyclus. This tick carries a bacteria called Barrelia, and can cause paralysis (and death) in its hosts. While it primarily targets bandicoots, I learned that Ixodes holocyclus is the most dangerous arthropod (insect) in Queensland.

1:00-2:00: lunch

Time for lunch! Today, I have cauliflower rice with some other veggies, and sliced chicken left over from the day before.

2:00-5:00: Biology practical

In today’s practical, I team up with friends to identify arthropods. We have to classify the insects, and then work on a report to submit next week.

5:00-5:45: study on campus

Next, I find a quiet area on campus. I’m particularly a fan of the Michie Building, which always seems to have comfortable, sunny spots. Today, I work on an assignment for my Health Psychology course. I am creating a presentation on an

intervention for chronic kidney disease, so I work hard to make the PowerPoint look organized and professional.

5:45-6:00: go to Harveys for dinner

Dinnertime! I hop back onto the bus and go to the valley, the suburb where the training centre is. I love walking in Brisbane, especially at this time, because it isn’t too hot, nor is it too chilly. It is also lovely to see the sun setting over the river.

6:00-7:00: dinner

Dinner today is at a restaurant called Harveys, which serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Their menu features snacks like pâté and charcuterie, as well as fancy soups, salads, and regal main courses. I also love their dessert listing, which includes figs with honeycomb ice cream, Catalan custard, semolina syrup cake, and more. I order the dark chocolate tart with caramel ice cream, dates, and crème fraîche after my main course.

7:00-7:30: go to CIRCA

After a quick walk down one of my favourite streets, James Street, I arrive at the Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Art. On the third floor of this modern, beautiful building is C!RCA Training Centre. I also change my clothes, putting on a leotard and capris leggings that protect the backs of my knees during poses that may cause rubbing.

7:30-9:30: training

I have been training in aerial arts for almost two years, mostly in the aerial silks (and a few months on the aerial hoop). My favourite apparatus is the straps, which requires a lot of shoulder strength, stability, and flexibility. While I’m very much a beginner when it comes to this challenging discipline, I’m very determined to improve my skills at the C!RCA Training Centre in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane. Every Sunday, I take a private lesson with a talented, encouraging straps instructor called Ben. This trick, which is called a meat hook, is one of my favourites!

9:30-10:00: take the bus back home

Pretty self-explanatory. On the bus, I like to listen to music and look out the window, which helps me relax as I head back to Toowong, the suburb where I live. Today, I’m really feeling the upbeat tunes by Maroon 5, which I haven’t heard for a few years.

10:00-10:15: take a shower

I have a special sponge that I bought at a convention in Brisbane, and it always makes me excited to wash my face. Since I slop on the sunscreen every morning, it’s helpful to have a gentle exfoliant to clear up my skin. A cold shower always makes me feel refreshed, even if I’m sweating again after towelling off!

10:15-11:15: study or do my assignment

I’ll be honest, I probably don’t do as much studying as I should at nighttime. In reality, I’m probably browsing social media or watching YouTube videos; in my head, I’m revising my notes on the social determinants of health. Well, it’s the thought that counts, and at least I thought about studying.

11:15-11:30: text my sister, wind down for bed

My sister, who lives in Canada, is currently in her senior year of high school – she is graduating soon! Seline is my best friend, and my number one favourite person in the world. We text each other way too much, whether it’s about books, movies, school, or something only the two of us understand.

11:30: sleep!

I fall asleep within ten seconds of lying down and closing my eyes. I actually tested this. Good night!

4 thoughts on “A Typical Day in the Life

  1. What a busy day you have! It must be thrilling to keep up with such a schedule–I would love to have that excitement and stimulation, but I definitely would utilize the weekends to recharge, haha! The Biology course sounds really fascinating as well!
    LOVED learning about what you do in a day. Goes to show that college life can be fun and fulfilling in terms of education and recreational activities!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. the life of a student… at least the classes aren’t too early! aerial silks is so cool! i did a class a long time ago and felt powerful up there but it does require some strength (not that i’m any stronger now). i’m so jealous that you fall asleep so fast though! i think about too much at nighttime!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great insight into your life. It’s great when volunteering can have a benefit too.
    I hate to be that guy, but ticks are arachnids and not insects.
    I’d also argue that in terms of vector borne diseases, mosquitoes are very dangerous in Australia and even though we’ve freed this country of malaria, we have malaria permissive mosquitoes here.
    The nastiest thing about ticks here is tick bite allergy and mammalian meat allergy plus the rickettsial infections that are tick borne.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good catch! The course is actually called ARTHROPODS (the phylum which encompasses classes insecta and arachnida) and Human Health; but I always tell people that the course is about insects and health because they typically look confused when I say ‘arthropods’. You are the first person to call me out on that, haha 🙂

      Absolutely. I didn’t think ticks were harmful until now!

      Liked by 2 people

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