Night Markets, Eel Rice, and Airport Adventures | Last Days in Taiwan

Hello, everyone!

I hope you are all having a wonderful week so far. It’s now Friday morning, and I’m happy to be back home with my family in BC. Next Thursday, I’ll be flying off to Australia, so I’m thrilled to have some time to unwind, unpack, and… repack.

But first, let’s look at some eats!

On one of our last days in Taiwan, we had breakfast at the buffet at our hotel, the Taipei Hero House. I ate two plates, and particularly loved the steamed bun (mantou), pickled turnips, Taiwanese braised pork rice, and sautéed cabbage.

At Yum Cha, a dim sum restaurant, we ordered:

  • siu mai with pork and shrimp
  • wok-fried beef strips and wide rice noodles
  • eggplant with spicy pork and salted fish
  • glutinous rice and chicken in a lotus leaf

Another morning, I had a lovely quiche from a coffee shop in the airport. This quiche was labelled as “chicken and vegetable”, but I didn’t detect a single piece of chicken in here. That was no problem, though, because it was stuffed with onion and mushroom – it was super flavourful.

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That night, Dad and I went to a night market called Raohe Street Night Market, which primarily caters to tourists. First up: an oyster omelet with plenty of sweet and sour sauce. I love oyster omelets, and this was a great way to kick a the night of eating.

Then, I ate:

  • deep-fried taro ball filled with cheese
  • deep-fried taro ball filled with red bean paste and salted egg yolk (unpictured)
  • taro milk
  • cheese bubble waffle
  • stinky tofu with pickled cabbage
  • Taiwanese tempura with pig blood cake (made with pork blood, sticky rice, broth, and steamed or cooked in a hot pot)
  • wheel cake filled with radish
  • wheel cake filled with cream
  • bolo bao (pineapple bun) filled with vanilla ice cream

The next day, Grandpa and I went to a botanical garden in Taipei and ate dim sum. The creamy salted egg yolk buns will always be my favourite.

We enjoyed food at a Japanese grill for lunch before watching a movie. The restaurant was packed with people, and the line extended for a block! Everyone in the restaurant ate very quickly, and I felt like I didn’t have time to enjoy my meal to the fullest.

I ordered the small steamed rice box with eel. I love eel (unagi), and my mom used to make it for me all the time when I was little. On the side, we enjoyed deep-fried oysters with Japanese-style “tartar” sauce, sautéed vegetables, grilled squid, blackened pork kebabs, and miso soup.

Then, we went to watch The Death Cure. Guys. If I’m not eating, sleeping, or studying, I’m probably somewhere obsessing over some YA novel or its movie. Anyways, The Death Cure came out early in Taiwan (as most movies do), and I watched it with my great-aunt, dad, and grandfather. Sorry Seline – we planned to see the midnight premiere together. 😥 No regrets on my end, though. Definitely need some more time to process it.

I thought the movie was absolutely electrifying. I like the Maze Runner series more than Divergent, and I felt like the movies certainly did the books justice. It is also refreshing to have a courageous, yet emotional, male lead in a dystopian YA film. The Death Cure had funny snippets of dialogue and expressions that added comedic relief – interlaced with shocking parts that I never saw coming. Did anyone else see this yet?

After the movie, my mind was muddled with bombs and explosions and moral corruptness, and we went to Starbucks for some coffee and chatting. Dad and I also had time to go to Carrefour (similar to Wal-Mart), where we picked up some slippers to bring home for guests.

After some more walking, and shopping in old Taiwan’s local market, we ate wontons. These wontons were smothered with a delicious sesame sauce, soy sauce, and plenty of scallions. They were delicious!

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At the Taoyuan International Airport, more food: delicious soup dumplings with soy sauce and ginger. I love soup dumplings, but would never believe that an airport could make such tasty ones. This was lovely, and I had a great mug of dark hot chocolate from Godiva.

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Then I established this lame, but exciting-to-me, list!

Things I got to eat in Taiwan:

  • beef noodles
  • soy milk
  • Chinese donut
  • bean curd
  • fried oysters
  • milk tea
  • beef intestine salad
  • tian bu la (tempura)
  • pig blood cake
  • shaved ice mountain (bao bing)
  • mochi
  • pineapple bun
  • glutinous oil rice
  • fried cruller in a baked flatbread (shao bing you tiao)
  • stinky tofu
  • fried stinky tofu
  • taro milk
  • braised pork rice with eggplant
  • oyster omelet
  • beef rolls

Things that I sadly did not have the opportunity to enjoy:

  • egg pancake (dan bing)
  • salt and pepper chicken
  • ba wan (Taiwanese glutinous meatballs)
  • fried buns
  • pineapple cake
  • scallion pancakes
  • gua bao
  • sun cakes

Twelve hours later, I found myself giggling with my sister back home!

At Earls, my family enjoyed lunch together. My plate included fried salmon with a dill and pepper sauce, buttery asparagus, and jasmine rice with scallions and fried onions. This meal was incredibly flavourful, and it was great to eat salmon again!

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That is it for today, mes amis. 🙂 I hope you all have a fantastic Friday.

7 thoughts on “Night Markets, Eel Rice, and Airport Adventures | Last Days in Taiwan

  1. Hi. I have a question. I’ve enjoyed watching you travel with your dad and grand dad. In a week, you are flying from Canada to Australia. That’s another really long flight. Why didn’t you just hang out in Taiwan for a week and fly from there?

    I travel a lot. That’s what I would have done. It’s easier on your body because you are flying in and out of so many time zones. And, it’s a shorter flight.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s a really good question! It’s because we packed very few things for our trip to Asia (I had one little 6-kg carry-on), but will be bringing lots of clothes, household items, school supplies, etc., for my five months in Australia.

      Fortunately, the jet lag hasn’t been extreme (naps here and there), but I’m not very excited about that long 15-hour flight from Vancouver to Brisbane.

      Like

      1. Oh. I didn’t realize you were staying for five months. That does changes things a little. 🙂

        I know. I used to commute from Dallas, TX to Hong Kong with travel to Singapore and often somewhere in SE Asia. That was all work-related. I had my tricks for jet lag recovery, but still…

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Wow! That must be quite the flight. Though I have to say that the HK airport is lovely, and I’ve heard wonderful things about the Changi Airport as well. What are your best tips for recovering from jet lag?

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      3. HK is already a little out of date. Changi is wonderful. You could probably spend a day there even if you weren’t flying.

        Jet leg. Try to stay away from caffeine for three days prior to flying. Start hydrating very seriously about three days out. Really push the water. No caffeine onboard until the very last hour or so when the last meal is served. That little jolt will push you through whatever day is left. I try to arrive at night, but you can’t do anything about that now.

        Upon arrival. I check in to my hotel, take a shower and take a long walk. Take another shower if you are in humidity. I cheat a little by taking an Ambien. I try to sleep until at least 5 am. Outbound, you are jet lagged for about ten days even if you are sleeping better. Your body is still slightly off. So try to add about 15 minutes of sleep per day. Whatever you do, don’t nap in the middle of the day unless you set an alarm for about an hour. A long sleep then will set back your recovery.

        Hope some of that helps.

        Oh, one more thing. Try not to eat too much hard protein (meat) before you leave. It’s easier on you if you don’t.

        Liked by 1 person

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